September 21, 2017

Foam and Balloons on Pritchard Island

A small group of us made it through a tidal creek at low tide and 2 feet of water to get at some of the foam residing on Pritchard Island.

Jackie

Jackie

We tried to stay focused on the foam that apparently is debris from the burnt out shrimp boat that drifted onto this beach.  Left in place this foam will break up into bite size yellow chunks that will be consumed by wildlife.

We removed a tremendous amount of foam.  About 30 large burlap sacks were removed from the high tide line.  Unfortunately, there is a tremendous amount of foam, trash, debris and treated lumber remaining on this island.

One of the items that really stood out on this island was the number of Mylar and plastic balloons  that were on this uninhabited island.  Sea turtles eat this material and it either kills them or makes them sick enough that they end up in a rescue center having to have it removed from their stomachs.  So as we came across the balloons we removed them, but for the most part stuck to just removing the foam.

These balloons contained messages that included Rest in Peace, Get Well, Congratulations, Happy Birthday, and Jurassic Park.  And they ranged in age from being new to all of the coloring removed due to age and the environment.

It was an 87 degree, high humidity day, and we had to move the bags a mile down the beach.  Some of this foam had metal and large chunks of fiberglass attached and was very heavy.  The foam become even heavier once it was wet when walking in the ocean to circumvent some of the trees laying on the beach.

We have some awesome volunteers.

Windswept sand

Windswept sand

Heading back

Heading back

Keith and Mike

Keith and Mike with some of the foam we collected in the background and in front of them

Sue changing clothes on the beach

Sue at the end of the cleanup

The beauty of the beach

The beauty of the beach

Next island over with an outhouse.

Next island over with an outhouse.

Sailboat wreck on the edge of a tidal creek on Capers Island

Sailboat wreck on the edge of a tidal creek on Capers Island

Keith, Jill. Steve and Jackie heading home to clean the boat.

Keith, Jill. Steve and Jackie heading home to clean the boat.

Tom getting ready to return to the boat ramp.

Tom getting ready to return to the boat ramp.

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Trying to add some class to Wounded Nature. Jackie packed real glasses and wine for rehydration after the cleanup. Ice cold beer, water and soda was also available.

Jackie towing a bag of foam.

Jackie towing a bag of foam.

Sue and Jill towing bags of foam down the beach

Sue and Jill towing bags of foam down the beach

Nylar balloon

Mylar balloon

Nylar balloon

Mylar balloon

Nylar balloon

Mylar balloon

White piece in this photo is a large cooler lid. There were several on this island. This was molded plastic vs styrofoam so we left it.

White piece in this photo is a large cooler lid. There were several on this island. This was molded plastic vs styrofoam so we left it.

Some of the foam that we left due to available

Some of the foam that we left due to tide and manpower constraints

Nylar balloon

Mylar balloon

Plastic balloon that had Juristic Park logo on the other side

Plastic balloon that had Juristic Park logo on the other side

Looked like some sort of plastic air junction box for a car - we left it.

Looked like some sort of plastic air junction box for a car – we left it.

We see plastic eatery often on cleanups but focused primarily on foam this trip and so this fork remains.

We see plastic eatery often on cleanups but focused primarily on foam this trip and so this fork remains.

Some of the foam we did not get to.

Some of the foam we did not get to.

Nylar balloon

Mylar balloon

Debris left behind

Debris left behind

Tire and debris left behind

Tire and debris left behind

Os[rey nest

Osprey nest

Nylar balloon

Mylar balloon

Nylar balloon

Mylar balloon

 

Osprey Nest

Osprey Nest

Cleaning up some of the foam debris

Cleaning up some of the foam debris

Steve on the laft and Jackie is far right

Steve on the left and Jackie is far right

An area we did not get to

An area we did not get to

An area we did not get to

An area we did not get to

Nylar balloon

Mylar balloon

Plastic balloon

Plastic balloon

Shrimp boat remains

Shrimp boat remains

Shrimp boat remains

Shrimp boat remains

Shrimp boat remains

Shrimp boat remains

Shrimp boat remains

Shrimp boat remains

Kathy

Kathy

 

Jackie

Jackie

Jackie

Jackie

A lot of this foam remains in place

A lot of this foam remains – we did not have the time and manpower to remove it

A lot of this foam still remains

This foam still remains on the island

Foam pieces

Foam pieces

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Keith

Large fiberglass piece of what we assume was the shrimp boat - approx 10 x 15 ft

Large fiberglass piece of what we assume was part of the shrimp boat – approx 10 x 15 ft It remains on the island.

South end of Pritchard Island

South end of Pritchard Island

This oyster bed sits ded center in the creek and is completely submerged during high tide. Will rip out a fiberglass hull.

This oyster bed sits dead center in the creek and is completely submerged during high tide. Can rip up a fiberglass hull.

Navigating sand bars and oyster beds

Navigating sand bars and oyster beds

Cautious trip through the shallow creek

Cautious trip through the shallow creek

The ride out across the bay.

The ride out across the bay.

What remains if a shrimp boat that burnt down to the water line.

What remains if a shrimp boat that burnt down to the water line.

Mike on what remains of the bow of the burnt to the water line shrimp boat.

Mike on what remains of the bow of the burnt to the water line shrimp boat.

Osprey nest with mom and baby in the nest. Dad was flying overhead.

Osprey nest with mom and baby in the nest. Dad was flying overhead.

Navigatigating a tidal creek around oyster beds and sand bars in less than 3 feet of water to get to a landing spot on Pritchard Island.

Navigatigating a tidal creek around oyster beds and sand bars in less than 3 feet of water to get to a landing spot on Pritchard Island.